The Vacation Ambience

When several of my friends suggested that taking a break from work might do my fibromyalgia some good, I was never quite certain that would be the answer. After a recent vacation to my hometown in India, for the first time, I felt there might be some truth in that!

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For the three weeks that I was visiting my parents, I noticed a sharp decrease in my chronic pain levels. And with some pacing, I was able to retain good energy levels as well, and pack quite a few (not terribly hectic) activities. I cannot stress enough the value of pacing during this trip, and how well it served me!

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However, I think there were several other things at play there to promote my wellness. Perhaps the most important ones were:

(1) Stable weather – not too hot, not too cold, low humidity, and stayed that way!
This was a dream-come-true after the kind of changes we go through constantly where I live now.

(2) Lack of the repetitive actions that I am constantly engaged in at work.

(3) Lack of stress and a general atmosphere of relaxation.

Until about last week, I would have probably swapped the last two on the #2 and #3 spots. But one week back at the work, with all the pipetting and computer work, and I realized just how much my right arm, and right upper back and shoulders are aggravated by the repetitive motions.

Realizing the effect of repetitive strain is also what made me give serious thought to taking some time off, especially after I noticed how much better I continued to feel even after the vacation was over. I am not sure if this break can ever be reality – especially given practical considerations such as the cost of my medication, and the huge financial burden it would be if my husband were to cover the cost of my health insurance as well. Not to mention, the clock starts ticking immediately after one receives their Ph.D. Most grants and many “entry-level” job positions are not available past a certain number of years post receipt of the doctorate degree. So without a productive next few years, I could be stuck between a rock and a hard place in the future, with very few avenues regarding my career. But though an extended break might be a bad professional decision right now, later on down the line, it might make for a great personal care decision, and I am certainly keeping it in mind!

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As for the general atmosphere of relaxation, the beautiful home and garden decorations at my parents’ house played no small part in creating it. The designer, my mother, could probably rival any interior/exterior decorator with her ideas. She really made me feel like I was in a 5-star hotel while simultaneously feeling at home! So for this week’s photo challenge on ambience, I shared a few photos of her garden, throughout the post, which created a lovely “vacation ambience” that made me forget about work in ways I can never do at home. And that kind of lack of stress, I do believe, played a major role in managing my symptoms despite the packed two-and-half weeks I spent at that house. Relaxation truly goes a long way for pain relief!

Gentle hugs,

Fibronacci

Slow and Steady Stay in the Race

Yesterday, I spent some time meditating and reflecting over the last couple of years of my life. It was brought on by a conscious decision to slow down my pace as the stresses mount on me towards the end of the semester causing a steady decline in my health. Though I sometimes feel guilty or silly for slowing down, I keep telling myself that it is not a crime to put your health before your work, and take a weekend off to recharge. In the long run, I think that will be the key to my finding some level of normalcy in my life. And looking back, I think it already has!

Featured image: Finding Light (9X12, oil on canvas). I could not think of a more appropriate painting that could possibly describe the journey that I write about below.

A year or so ago, when I hadn’t learned to slow down yet, I was super-miserable all the time. Every day I would force myself to rise even though I felt thoroughly unrefreshed. I ignored the stiffness in my body that screamed in pain when I overruled its need for rest and forced it into some clothes and shoes as I made my way to work. Despite the gallons of coffee, every afternoon, I was close to passing out from exhaustion. I would have to crawl my way home before I collapsed to save myself the indignity of passing out at work (which has also happened before). I was on a non-stop roller-coaster ride where I ignored my body to accomplish more things, but then I would hit a new low and not be able to rise from bed for the next few days. I worked my ass off the days I was at work and then wasn’t able to work at all for several days after. I needed at least one sick day every week on average, especially after the days I taught two classes back-to-back, 2-3 hours each. Several times, I thought of quitting everything, wondering if anything was worth it anymore.

Then at one point, I learned better. I don’t know what pushed me over the edge – maybe it was a missed opportunity to attend a conference because I couldn’t get up from bed that day – but I decided to quit that lifestyle. For good. I slowed down. I went to work later than usual, and gave myself time to “thaw” and meditate in the mornings. I cut my work hours down to 6-8 a day (instead of 10-12, at times 15, before). I switched out my chair for a slightly more comfortable one. I accepted the help of a pillow from a friend. I wasn’t shy about using a heating pad at work – which helped a LOT! I got a box and put it under my desk, ahead of my chair, so I had make-shift chair-cum-recliner to help ease the pressure on my legs. Sometimes, I use my electro-therapy machine for a quick massage at work and try not to feel awkward using it. I started taking more weekends off to recharge than I ever did before. I spent more time with my husband, learned to relax more, explore the outdoors, exercise gently and try to be happier outside of work in general. I started thinking about quitting the crazy scientist routine and finding a job I could be happy in (aka, one that is sciencey), but one that would also allow me some guilt-free time off.

This was not an easy change for me. And I would say I am still in a transition state, because I still feel guilty at times about the time I take off from work and feel the need to push myself harder than I should. BUT . . . what I have been able to do so far has already helped! While I still have ups and downs, they are not nearly as dramatic as they used to be. I feel calmer and more grounded in general than I ever did before. While I still feel an energy crash towards the end of the day, I feel the blow of the crash less harshly than before. While afternoons are still rough on me, I now use some tea and meditation to try to calm my body instead of the gallons of coffee I dumped inside me before. And I have fewer days when I feel like I am about to pass out from the exhaustion. I also need to take fewer sick-days off from work now that I work less everyday. In other words, I am starting to find a steady state for myself, that is lower than what it used to be, but it also means I have less far to fall when I do, and I fall less frequently!

From time to time, my old self still pipes up and wants me to speed up and stay rushed in order to win the race. But when I took life so fast, I failed to enjoy the sweet moments along the way. It’s like my surroundings were blurred, and I missed out on enjoying the fruits and flowers by the road-side. And then I hit a point, where I realized that if I didn’t slow down, I wouldn’t even be in the race! Fibromyalgia changed my perspective on life in general. Who cares if I win the race or not? (Why the hell are we running it anyway?) Even if I did win, I was losing so much along the way that was it even worth it? Life with fibromyalgia feels more like a marathon than a sprint. The slow and steady may or may not win the race, but at least they can continue to stay in the race. And maybe, just maybe, that’s more important anyway!

Love,

Fibronacci