How Acceptance can lead to Happiness

A few weeks ago, I was triggered by an certain events to give some serious thought regarding “acceptance” of a chronic condition as a philosophy. And then of course, I had to wonder: why do we seek acceptance in the first place?

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On a practical level, acceptance can mean that we are finally in tune with our bodies, and are working it without overworking it. Thus, we are able to find some sort of a steady state for ourselves, where the ups and downs are not too high or too low. This, of course, is a reason all by itself to accept an unpredictable and often brutal illness like fibromyalgia!

But I feel like the true essence of why we seek acceptance lies in its emotional impact. A state of acceptance promotes a state of happiness.

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Chronic illnesses are difficult beasts to deal with. I had previously likened fibromyalgia to being in an abusive relationship, in many ways. It is the invisible partner in my life, who beats me black and blue from time to time, often for no apparent reason. Such chronic conditions can be extremely frustrating to try to build a life around.

When one is in denial of a chronic condition, I feel that is akin to an all-out physical battle between the self and illness. The self wants to make no room for the illness; and the illness retaliates with resentment, and wishes to annihilate the self! On the other end of the spectrum, when one is resigned to the chronic illness, they have given up the fight completely, the enemy is camping out in the self, ravaging it from within. Both states leave the chronic illness sufferer feeling very helpless, as they struggles with losing control over their bodies, and their lives in general. Neither is conducive to seeking happiness with a chronic illness.

Somewhere along that continuum lies acceptance. Here, there is no all-out battle; neither is there a simple surrender. It is more of a quiet, deliberate, game of chess between the self and illness. Each calculates their move carefully; and if played right, the self usually gets the upper hand!

So how can acceptance lead to a state of happiness?

1. By offering PERSPECTIVE. Accepting a chronic illness does not mean being OK with half a glass of water, or even necessarily thinking it is “half full.” In my view, acceptance offers a realist’s perspective, where the glass is both “half full” and “half empty.” The chronic illness may have taken a lot from us, but we still have a lot of us left! Accepting the condition means taking both into account. We may have lost our energetic selves and left counting spoons through the day; but we still have our goals and interests! Being able to keep sight of the fact that we remain “ourselves,” underneath the burden of poor health, helps the happiness quotient!

2. By encouraging a PROBLEM-SOLVING attitude. Once we accept the chronic condition, we begin to acknowledge the associated problems and limitations, and then find practical solutions to them. Instead of the illness itself, the focus now is on overcoming the limitations the chronic condition imposes. This problem-solving attitude puts us back in charge! We can begin to plot how to rebuild our lives around the chronic condition. It is a way of regaining some control over our lives that the chronic illness may have snatched from us. Nobody likes to feel tossed around on the choppy waves like a rudderless boat. The feeling that we still have some power to steer our lives in a satisfactory direction, albeit perhaps towards an alternative to the original one planned, is an important ingredient in the recipe for happiness.

3. By promoting INNER PEACE. A combination of the understanding that the chronic illness does not fundamentally change who we are, and that we can continue to be somewhat in charge of how we work around it, promotes a sense of inner peace. We learn to identify that the chronic illness is a part of us, but that it is only one part of us (out of very many)! Once we have made some level of peace with that, it limits self-doubt that is often triggered by others who doubt us and/or our diagnoses/conditions. It all promotes a level of inner peace that I think is crucial to find a state of happiness, if not the very essence of happiness itself.

Most of my “happiness philosophy” stems purely from my own experiences, both from long-term growth as well as brief moments of revelation, followed by long periods of meditation on my experiences. But it’s interesting to see how much of it aligns with the current research on what makes people happy! Yet “happiness” is a very personal thing, with each person having their own definition of what happiness means to them.

But there is also a higher level unity in human psychology. People from almost any part of the world, belonging to any religion or any culture, generally find happiness when they feel like the universe is their friend, instead of it trying to thwart their every move. They find happiness when they can see themselves, and their trials and tribulations, in perspective, instead of feeling like they are being manipulated by unseen hands. And no matter how one defines what core happiness means to them, cultivating a state of mental peace is crucial regardless. In fact for many, that state of inner peace, itself, is what they might call happiness!

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Heartbeat – a digital abstract series focusing on the unity of minds in search of acceptance and happiness

It can be very difficult, however, to not feel like the universe is playing nasty practical jokes on you when you suffer from a chronic illness. And cultivating a state of peace amidst the inner turmoil can be difficult indeed. But accepting that illness may be the first step to emotional healing! As I said in my previous post, however, the road acceptance is not a straight path, and the very state of acceptance is along a continuum, and ever-changing like a dune. But regardless, in looking into ourselves to seek it anyway, we might unlock the secrets of finding our secret source of happiness.

Love,

Fibronacci

 

MORE IN THE ACCEPTANCE SERIES:
Part I: A Lesson in Perspective and Acceptance
Part II: What is “Acceptance”?
Part III: How Acceptance can lead to Happiness
Part IV (A): Seeking a State of Acceptance
Part IV (B): Fighting the Denial of a Chronic Illness

 

READ MORE ON ACCEPTANCE AND HAPPINESS:
On Acceptance and Healing
What does it mean to be chronically ill and happy?
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4 thoughts on “How Acceptance can lead to Happiness

  1. Agree when you say that happiness is a very personal thing. I think we all work on the three different points towards acceptance and happiness at different points in our lives. Problem-solving is an interesting one for me. As someone who suffes from hay-fever allergy symptoms, finding the right medication to keep it at bay has always been challenging. I know to stay away from dusty environments which helps. Recently one of the medicines I used to take no longer is in production. I tried taking another one with similar ingredients but that did not sit well with me. When it comes to problem-solving and chronic conditions, it can be trial-and-error until you find something that works.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Absolutely! I like how you point out that we work on these different points towards acceptance and happiness. Acceptance is not a passive thing that just happens to us at some point and makes us happy! All the positive virtues of acceptance that bring us happiness require us to be proactive about it. In fact, I was considering making a post talking about the kinds of things that helped me do exactly that.

      You bring up another good point about how problem-solving can be very frustrating, and I completely agree! But at least for me (and maybe this is why I’m a scientist, haha), as long as I know I have a problem that is capable of being solved (or managed), I have these these gears turning internally thinking what can be done, and if all options are exhausted, how can I think out of the box to come up with potential solutions. And as long as those gears are churning, and I can think out of the box, somewhere deep underneath the frustrations of failure, there is a little spark of joy — simply from the process of mental engagement, even though the actual outcomes ma be less than pleasurable! I struggle constantly with losing control over my body and my life due to FM, but when I am in problem-solving mode, it gives me back some of that control over my situation, that makes me happy. Does that make any sense? 🙂

      Like

      1. I think you’re write. When we’re in problem solving mode, as you mentioned the gears are turning and churning. We feel like there’s something to work to and we get up and do it, and so we be productive and get on with our lives as best as we can 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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