Coping with Chronic Fatigue

Until my last post, it had been a while since I was able to attend to my blog. Part of this was because I have been busy at the lab with an experiment schedule that took up even most weekends. The result of that has been a resurgence of my chronic fatigue problems.

However, as a graduate student, I am unable to give in to the FM fatigue completely (as much as I would like to!), and have had to find ways to cope with it at least partially.

So, today, as I lie on my bed unable to do much except go to the bathroom, I thought about writing about some of my fatigue-coping strategies.

Featured image: Good Morning (6X6, oil on canvas)

No, the irony of the topic of this post, nor its featured image, does not escape me – in fact, the irony is what spurs me on!

Here are the TOP 5 things that helped me cope with Fibromyalgia-associated fatigue:

#1. Muscle relaxers: This might sound counter-intuitive, but it turns out a large part of the fatigue in fibromyalgiacs may be due to extreme muscle tension. I found an increased muscle relaxer dose immensely helpful when struggling with deep fatigue over the summer. The pills could not make it go away 100% but I welcomed anything that made my life a tad more liveable! (If that sounds depressing, it’s because I was for most of the summer until I found some relief in these medicines.)

To be honest, my doctor and I talked about going the Adderall (low-dose amphetamine) route, instead of more muscle relaxers; but I felt my fatigue was largely due to poor sleep, and we hoped the muscle relaxer could have a double-effect on the muscle tension as well as lack of sleep. Besides I was secretly afraid that Adderall would only encourage me to overexert beyond what my body could naturally handle, eventually leading to a worse crash than otherwise. But if you think Adderall is something that might benefit you, read up on it and talk with your doctor about it!

#2. Rest:Β Good sleep is paramount for fatigue management. Unfortunately, it is also notoriously hard to come by! I found that the better-sleep effect of muscle relaxers wore off after a while. I have used a few other tactics – I might do a separate post about them later – but even they have worked only inconsistently. Here, however, by rest I simply mean to emphasize that you deserve some DOWN time!

Some days you just gotta allow those cells to die on the petri dish if you are not up to attending to them. You have to choose who is more important – the cells or you! (I know, some days, the cells are more important, but not when you REALLY need the down time to avoid a complete and total mental/physical breakdown.)

Other times, a little afternoon rest time at the office might be in order. I have put an ~2 ft. high styrofoam box under my table, with a blanket, along with a pillow and a heating pad against my back on the chair. This makes a makeshift recliner for when I just need to put my feet up! It also works for times when I am so tired I simply pass out at my desk!

#3. Move slowly and reduce stressful activities: This really just boils down to energy-conservation! If I move slowly, I expend less energy on the movement itself, so I can focus more energy on whatever it is I was moving in order to do!

Standing, walking, sitting for relatively long periods of time – even bathing! – are all tiring for me. So I keep those to a minimum as much as I can. I try to find a seat, or drive/take the bus to school (which is ~20 minutes walk from my home), and use a heating pad when sitting at my desk to reduce the pain and stiffness. As for bathing, I use a stool that fits in my tub, so I can sit instead of having to stand while showering; and I let my husband wash my hair once a week, instead of doing it myself more often. Luckily, I stay indoors most of the time, in climate-controlled conditions, so I am not as gross as you might think!

#4. Gentle exercise: This might be another counter-intuitive one, but gentle exercises in a warm-water pool have definitely made an impact on my endurance levels. Though I am often tired right after, in the long term it has helped me pull through the days better than before. This trend may not be true for CFS patients, but is certainly supported by the scientific literature for FM! Also, exercise may be the only thing that targets the root cause of the pain/fatigue in the central nervous system through the alteration of pain pathways.

#5. “Energifying” drinks, like coconut water and coffee/tea: I imagine the coconut water may help because of the electrolytes (my EP says the magnesium and potassium are important for reducing muscle tension and fatigue) and/or the sugar in it. However, it has less sugar than traditional sports drinks, and tastes better than water, so it is often my go-to drink. As a bonus, it also often helps with my nausea! As forΒ coffee/tea, I definitely need some of it to kickstart my day, or add a little pep to my afternoon, but a ton of caffeine does little to curb chronic fatigue.

Finally, I want to make a case for aΒ balanced diet. A balanced diet with proteins and veggies is less likely to lead to an insulin-related energy crash than a carbs-rich diet. As such, I have tried to add more fruits and veggies to my meals. We also only try to buy basmati rice, which has a lower glycemic index and causes less of a “sugar-high” (followed by a “sugar-low”) compared to other types of rice. I am not sensitive to gluten, but if you are, that is something else to consider as well.

The balanced diet did not feature in my “top 5,” because I am not sure my diet changes have made any difference in my fatigue. That is consistent with the prevalent thought that fatigue in FM and CFS patients may be more centrally regulated than diet-related. That being said, diet-related energy lows could likely add to the pre-existing fatigue in some FM/CFS patients. So the diet may be worthwhile a consideration, along with my “top 5”, if you are struggling with chronic fatigue.

Love,

Fibronacci

P.S.: “Energifying” = the fibro-fog word for “energizing”! This just occurred to me a good 30 minutes after publishing the post, but I like that word, so I am going to let it stay!

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14 thoughts on “Coping with Chronic Fatigue

    1. It has been a learning process Laura. And I am still learning! πŸ™‚ It has been nice to document my progress here though, and share with others what has helped me, just in case somebody somewhere finds something of a tiny bit of use to them. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  1. One of the hardest things for me to learn was patience. It’s like learning how to change the speed of your life. Pain demands that you take everything slow. I have very little patience, but I’m learning. πŸ™‚

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    1. I agree, same here, and not sure I have well and truly learned my lesson yet! I often forget to give myself “extra time” to walk to the parking lot, or to and from different buildings, etc. which often results in either me being late, or an exacerbation of my symptoms. Also, keeping up with a group of people if we are walking together is a constant source of frustration for me. I am either embarrassed to be lagging behind by myself (which is most often the case) or I am trying to rush to keep up their normal pace and wear myself out. :/

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                1. Well, there are ways to sell them as stock footage or sell rights to usage on commercials, stuff like that. Do some internet searches and I am sure you will find tons of ideas on tons of websites. Not sure how lucrative these types of things are, but considering how good you are at it, your photos may well be a source of some little income for you. πŸ™‚

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                  1. If I were to make any money, I could be in danger of losing my Social Security benefits. And that’s all I got. (Hopefully, Trump won’t do any damage to my benefits.) You are so nice to encourage me and appreciate my art therapy. Thanks, dude. πŸ™‚

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