Slow and Steady Stay in the Race

Yesterday, I spent some time meditating and reflecting over the last couple of years of my life. It was brought on by a conscious decision to slow down my pace as the stresses mount on me towards the end of the semester causing a steady decline in my health. Though I sometimes feel guilty or silly for slowing down, I keep telling myself that it is not a crime to put your health before your work, and take a weekend off to recharge. In the long run, I think that will be the key to my finding some level of normalcy in my life. And looking back, I think it already has!

Featured image: Finding Light (9X12, oil on canvas). I could not think of a more appropriate painting that could possibly describe the journey that I write about below.

A year or so ago, when I hadn’t learned to slow down yet, I was super-miserable all the time. Every day I would force myself to rise even though I felt thoroughly unrefreshed. I ignored the stiffness in my body that screamed in pain when I overruled its need for rest and forced it into some clothes and shoes as I made my way to work. Despite the gallons of coffee, every afternoon, I was close to passing out from exhaustion. I would have to crawl my way home before I collapsed to save myself the indignity of passing out at work (which has also happened before). I was on a non-stop roller-coaster ride where I ignored my body to accomplish more things, but then I would hit a new low and not be able to rise from bed for the next few days. I worked my ass off the days I was at work and then wasn’t able to work at all for several days after. I needed at least one sick day every week on average, especially after the days I taught two classes back-to-back, 2-3 hours each. Several times, I thought of quitting everything, wondering if anything was worth it anymore.

Then at one point, I learned better. I don’t know what pushed me over the edge – maybe it was a missed opportunity to attend a conference because I couldn’t get up from bed that day – but I decided to quit that lifestyle. For good. I slowed down. I went to work later than usual, and gave myself time to “thaw” and meditate in the mornings. I cut my work hours down to 6-8 a day (instead of 10-12, at times 15, before). I switched out my chair for a slightly more comfortable one. I accepted the help of a pillow from a friend. I wasn’t shy about using a heating pad at work – which helped a LOT! I got a box and put it under my desk, ahead of my chair, so I had make-shift chair-cum-recliner to help ease the pressure on my legs. Sometimes, I use my electro-therapy machine for a quick massage at work and try not to feel awkward using it. I started taking more weekends off to recharge than I ever did before. I spent more time with my husband, learned to relax more, explore the outdoors, exercise gently and try to be happier outside of work in general. I started thinking about quitting the crazy scientist routine and finding a job I could be happy in (aka, one that is sciencey), but one that would also allow me some guilt-free time off.

This was not an easy change for me. And I would say I am still in a transition state, because I still feel guilty at times about the time I take off from work and feel the need to push myself harder than I should. BUT . . . what I have been able to do so far has already helped! While I still have ups and downs, they are not nearly as dramatic as they used to be. I feel calmer and more grounded in general than I ever did before. While I still feel an energy crash towards the end of the day, I feel the blow of the crash less harshly than before. While afternoons are still rough on me, I now use some tea and meditation to try to calm my body instead of the gallons of coffee I dumped inside me before. And I have fewer days when I feel like I am about to pass out from the exhaustion. I also need to take fewer sick-days off from work now that I work less everyday. In other words, I am starting to find a steady state for myself, that is lower than what it used to be, but it also means I have less far to fall when I do, and I fall less frequently!

From time to time, my old self still pipes up and wants me to speed up and stay rushed in order to win the race. But when I took life so fast, I failed to enjoy the sweet moments along the way. It’s like my surroundings were blurred, and I missed out on enjoying the fruits and flowers by the road-side. And then I hit a point, where I realized that if I didn’t slow down, I wouldn’t even be in the race! Fibromyalgia changed my perspective on life in general. Who cares if I win the race or not? (Why the hell are we running it anyway?) Even if I did win, I was losing so much along the way that was it even worth it? Life with fibromyalgia feels more like a marathon than a sprint. The slow and steady may or may not win the race, but at least they can continue to stay in the race. And maybe, just maybe, that’s more important anyway!

Love,

Fibronacci

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4 thoughts on “Slow and Steady Stay in the Race

  1. I really enjoy reading your articles and seeing your art work. After returning from my journey to Brasil in 2006 and Senegal in 2013 I remember noticing the speed of life in the western world, it’s insane! We are rushing to our graves! I prefer a marathon. slower but steady ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your kind words, Isabella! I am so glad you enjoy my articles and paintings. 🙂 Rushing to our graves is about right… I was guilty of it myself and now when I think back, I can’t imagine why I even did it. It is hard to explain such things to those who have not experienced it for themselves, they just don’t get it! But I agree, I think I prefer the marathon as well. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for the encouragement! This has been such a huge, life-changing step for me (and not one that is widely approved of in my current setting) that I really appreciate the support. 🙂 ❤

      Like

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